Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon in FX’s Feud Official Trailer #1

If you can’t see the video, you can watch here.

FX Networks has just released the first FEUD trailer. In the player below, you can take a look at Ryan Murphy’s upcoming limited series about the infamous dispute between Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. Headlining the show is Susan Sarandon as Bette Davis and Jessica Lange as Joan Crawford. Via the gallery viewer at the bottom of this page, you can also take a first look at the stars in character as they appear on the cover of the latest issue of EW.

From Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning Executive Producer Ryan Murphy, FEUD will premiere on Sunday, March 5 at 10 PM ET/PT on FX. The first installment begins the story of the legendary rivalry during Crawford and Davis’ collaboration on the Academy Award-nominated thriller What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, and well after the cameras stopped rolling. The series explores how the two women endured ageism, sexism, and misogyny while struggling to hang on to success and fame in the twilight of their careers.

In addition to Oscar winners Lange and Sarandon, the cast includes Alfred Molina as the film’s director Robert Aldrich, Stanley Tucci as studio titan Jack Warner, Judy Davis as gossip columnist Hedda Hopper, Jackie Hoffman as Crawford’s housekeeper Mamacita, and Alison Wright as Aldrich’s assistant Pauline. Notable guest stars include Dominic Burgess as Crawford and Davis’ co-star Victor Buono, Academy Award winner Catherine Zeta-Jones as film star Olivia De Havilland, Sarah Paulson as Geraldine Page, Academy Award winner Kathy Bates as Joan Blondell and Kiernan Shipka as B.D., Bette Davis’ daughter.

Murphy serves as Executive Producer on FEUD along with Executive Producers Tim Minear, Alexis Martin Woodall, and Dede Gardner and Brad Pitt of Plan B Entertainment. The series is produced by Fox 21 Television Studios.

What do you think of the FEUD trailer? Will you tune in for this one in March?

Source: Coming Soon

Kiernan Shipka Wrote an Essay About Feminism and Fashion

And Why They’re BOTH So Necessary

The actress gets real for our September issue.

Editor’s Note: For our very special September Issue, Kiernan Shipka got to experience an anything-but-typical trip of a lifetime to explore the Chanel flower fields during the yearly, three-week May rose harvest. There, Kiernan learned exactly what goes into the iconic Chanel No. 5 fragrance (which was created by Coco Chanel herself in 1921) and the new No. 5 L’Eau, which mixes jaunty hints of citrus with the house’s signature rose de mai.

A few weeks later, it’s clear the trip left a lasting impression on the starlet, who can be seen next on the big screen in The Blackcoat’s Daughter. Our time in the fields and Coco Chanel’s sensibilities proved so inspiring to the actress that she was compelled to open up in the essay below about her current relationship with fashion, feminism, and femininity and why they can beautifully coexist.

Coco Chanel once said, “Look for the woman in the dress. If there is no woman, there is no dress.” I recently learned more about the iconic designer, who made her make rebelling against gender norms of her time, on a dream-come-true trip earlier this summer to France. I toured Coco’s apartment in Paris and also visited the rose fields of Grasse, the birthplace of Chanel No. 5. It was an expedition that changed the way I thought about the designer and her brand. I think I even changed a bit after learning so much about such a complex person and spending time in such a spectacular place.

Similar to Coco, I’ve never been someone who has thought fashion and feminism are mutually exclusive. In fact, I think they work together in a lovely, empowering way. For me, feminism is about being who you want and having the freedom of choice. As long as you have that, you should be able to dress however you like, whether it means ultrafeminine, supertomboyish, or something else entirely.

I was 6 when I started playing Sally Draper on Mad Men. I feel incredibly lucky that my first major role was someone with a lot of depth and growth, and that I was surrounded by people who treated me like a peer. For nearly eight years, I portrayed a very complicated and realized character, and there’s no question that being Sally (who is much cooler than me, by the way) has influenced my being in so many ways.

I grew up on a set surrounded by strong actresses, as fearless in real life as the roles they played, not to mention so many female writers, directors, and crew members. That was my acting school. It raised the bar for me — and influenced me. Having worked with forces of nature like Janie Bryant, Leslie Linka Glatter, and January Jones, I found my environment was so celebratory of women that it became natural for me to be myself and not live according to any standards that held me back.

I recently reached a stage in my style when I decided I was just going to really go for it. What people think no longer matters to me. I just want to enjoy myself. This mindset has made me so excited about fashion and so excited about taking risks. I’m having more fun than ever with how I dress, and I’m learning so much about my personal aesthetic along the way. I’m known for wearing a lot of feminine dresses, but lately I’ve been really into pants and how great they feel to wear (I think Coco, who made trousers more socially acceptable on women, would approve!). They’re easier to dance in, and I never know when I’m going to bust a move. Whatever the occasion, if I find a cool pair, you can count on me to be wearing them. Even if there is no dress, there can still be a woman.

Source: Teen Vogue

Kiernan Shipka: wide awake in dreamland

Follow the actress, spring issue cover star and Dazed 100 contender through dreamland in Ben Toms’ latest visual artistry

Growing up on screen as Mad Men’s Sally Draper, Kiernan Shipka is graduating into a deeper and darker realm of film. With a leading role as a schoolgirl possessed by the devil in upcoming horror February and her own creative ideas swirling for the year ahead, Shipka is welcoming 2016 with open arms.

Kiernan Shipka Is Next, Next, Next!

One of W’s 3 April 2016 cover stars mouths off.

Kiernan Shipka is an old soul in the body of a 16-year-old girl. She’s the type of person who goes to Paris for a Dior show, falls in love with the city, and then decides to learn French. Which she did. Immediately. Although she has been acting since infancy (“I did some Gerber-baby action”) and has always been homeschooled (“I was a kindergarten dropout”), Shipka, who stars in the upcoming thriller The Blackcoat’s Daughters, does not come across as a hothouse flower. On the contrary, she is remarkably adult: While I could easily be Shipka’s mother age-wise, speaking with her is like talking to a very smart, optimistic peer with excellent taste.

When she was 6, Shipka, who is blonde and petite and has huge brown eyes that convey both curiosity and empathy, auditioned for the part of Sally Draper on Mad Men. She grew up in the show—going from a small, lisping, adorable moppet in 1960 to the only person that her father, the show’s antihero, Don Draper, truly trusted in 1970. The heroines of Mad Men—including Sally—represented the potential of America, a glimpse at a brighter future, run by sharp, knowing women.
Matthew Weiner, the series’ creator, replaced the actors who played her brothers as they aged but kept Shipka in her role. “She was a kind of heartbeat for the show,” he told me. “And the only sequel to Mad Men that I can imagine is continuing the story of Sally Draper. I want to know what happens to her. And that is because of Kiernan.”

Lynn Hirschberg: What was the audition for Mad Men like?
Kiernan Shipka: I was 6, and before any audition, I would get so excited. I was obsessed: I liked learning lines. That was fun for me. I remember my first day on set. I was supposed to run into the scene with a plastic bag over my head, and my mother on the show says something like, “Your clothes better not be on the floor.” No one seemed to worry about the potential safety hazard of a 6-year-old with a plastic bag over her head! That was probably a little bit of foreshadowing, the darkness that was ahead for Sally.

LH: The scene where Sally walks in on her father during an illicit tryst was deeply troubling to me. Did you actually see what Sally saw? Weren’t you too young to watch the show at all?
KS: I didn’t see what Sally saw. I think Jon Hamm was on his phone rather than in bed! But I didn’t watch Mad Men until I was 13—when I was home sick and watched all the seasons on Netflix. It was a lovely treat.

LH: Until Season 4, Sally didn’t get much hair or makeup. And, then, it was kind of an explosion of style.
KS: Mad Men introduced me to the power of fashion. I realized that style could tell a story. In the last season, Sally wants to impress a boy, so she dresses up. In the scene, I had to smoke a cigarette—and I’m not a pro in the slightest. They used these herbal cigarettes, and during the first take, I smoked it backwards.

LH: During the run of the show, you were homeschooled. Do you feel that you have missed out on any part of a regular school experience?
KS: Not really, but I do want to go to the prom. Or several proms, hopefully. That’s my goal. I’ve been to the Emmys, but prom—that’s where it’s at. [Laughs]

LH: You just celebrated your sweet 16. That’s kind of like a prom.
KS: I would say it was my favorite birthday! I wore pants and a top by Giamba, and it was a lot of fun. There was food and boys and everything, but it wasn’t a prom!

LH: Do you have a movie crush?
KS: I love Eddie Redmayne. I first saw him in Les Mis; I thought he was so, so good. And then The Theory of Everything came out, and he was spectacular. And he’s great in The Danish Girl. I love his commitment to his roles. He has great style too.

LH: What is your favorite love scene in a movie?
KS: Recently, I saw Frances Ha, and the friendship/love scenes between Greta Gerwig and Mickey Sumner rang so true to me. Even when they drift apart, their connection is still there.

LH: What was the first movie you remember seeing?
KS: When I was 6 or so, I had Harry Potter, The Wizard of Oz, The Sound of Music, and Air Bud on heavy rotation. I think I watched them all once a day.

LH: How did Air Bud get in there?
KS: It was about a cute dog! Who doesn’t love a cute-dog movie? I loved the whole Harry Potter squad, but Air Bud made me cry and cry.



Source: W Magazine