Feud 1×01 – Pilot | Screencaptures

I’ve updated our photo gallery with 40 screen captures of Kiernan Shipka as B.D. Hyman
in “Feud” (2017) from FX. Make sure you check them out by clicking the thumbnails below. Enjoy!


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Television Series > 2017 | Feud > Season 1 > Episode Screencaptures > Opening Credits
Television Series > 2017 | Feud > Season 1 > Episode Screencaptures > 1×01 – Pilot

Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon in FX’s Feud Official Trailer #1

If you can’t see the video, you can watch here.

FX Networks has just released the first FEUD trailer. In the player below, you can take a look at Ryan Murphy’s upcoming limited series about the infamous dispute between Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. Headlining the show is Susan Sarandon as Bette Davis and Jessica Lange as Joan Crawford. Via the gallery viewer at the bottom of this page, you can also take a first look at the stars in character as they appear on the cover of the latest issue of EW.

From Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning Executive Producer Ryan Murphy, FEUD will premiere on Sunday, March 5 at 10 PM ET/PT on FX. The first installment begins the story of the legendary rivalry during Crawford and Davis’ collaboration on the Academy Award-nominated thriller What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, and well after the cameras stopped rolling. The series explores how the two women endured ageism, sexism, and misogyny while struggling to hang on to success and fame in the twilight of their careers.

In addition to Oscar winners Lange and Sarandon, the cast includes Alfred Molina as the film’s director Robert Aldrich, Stanley Tucci as studio titan Jack Warner, Judy Davis as gossip columnist Hedda Hopper, Jackie Hoffman as Crawford’s housekeeper Mamacita, and Alison Wright as Aldrich’s assistant Pauline. Notable guest stars include Dominic Burgess as Crawford and Davis’ co-star Victor Buono, Academy Award winner Catherine Zeta-Jones as film star Olivia De Havilland, Sarah Paulson as Geraldine Page, Academy Award winner Kathy Bates as Joan Blondell and Kiernan Shipka as B.D., Bette Davis’ daughter.

Murphy serves as Executive Producer on FEUD along with Executive Producers Tim Minear, Alexis Martin Woodall, and Dede Gardner and Brad Pitt of Plan B Entertainment. The series is produced by Fox 21 Television Studios.

What do you think of the FEUD trailer? Will you tune in for this one in March?

Source: Coming Soon

Ryan Murphy Talks Modern Parallels of ‘Feud: Bette and Joan,’ Plan for Future Seasons

The prolific producer says potential seasons of the anthology drama will not take place in Hollywood.
Since its release in 1962, What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? has become a cult classic thanks to its combination of dark comedy and camp, not to mention the enduring appeal of stars Joan Crawford and Bette Davis.

However, Ryan Murphy promises that his upcoming anthology series Feud: Bette and Joan, which looks at the making of the movie and the relationship between the two stars, will be a much “deeper” exploration.

“I wasn’t interested in doing anything that was quote unquote campy,” he told reporters Thursday at the Television Critics Association winter press tour.

“I think there’s something much more delicate and moving, and for me, what I love about the show is … the issues in the show are modern and women are still going through this sort of stuff today. Nothing has really changed. We really wanted to lean into that aspect of the show.”

The eight-part drama stars Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon as Joan and Bette, respectively, and follows how two actresses struggling to find good roles later in their careers must band together, despite their personal differences, for a film in hopes that it will change both of their career trajectories.

Exec producer Dede Gardner agreed with Murphy’s sentiment about Feud’s relevancy in 2017. “I think the show is deeply modern. I think it’s delicious in its celebration of a town that was less crowded, but I don’t think it romanticizes it. I think it’s called it out for its truisms, but it was brutal. These women were treated brutally and made to treat one another brutally,” she said. “Seemingly this was the only way anyone was going to get ahead, and I don’t think much has changed in that regard. I think we could stand to improve a great bit.”

Murphy was inspired to do the series by looking at the lack of women in Hollywood last year after several reports pointed to the startling few number of women and minorities positioned behind the camera despite the proliferation of TV shows in the Peak TV era. Since then, Murphy has launched the Half foundation, which aims to put more women behind the camera.

“What came out of that for me was a lot of very moving sentiments from women, and from that I decided to jump off into Feud,” he said.

The struggle of women in Hollywood, and particularly for aging women in Hollywood, was something Lange said is still an issue today and pointed to Amy Schumer’s take on the subject: Last F—able Day in Hollywood from her Comedy Central series, a reference that drew laughter and recognition from the crowd.

“We’ve touched on that in a very profound way. Joan was 10 years younger when this takes place than I am now, yet her career was finished because of her age,” Lange said. “What we were talking about, especially with Joan, who was known for her tremendous beauty — what happens when that beauty is no longer considered viable?”

“I think that’s a big part of the show,” added Sarandon. “What Hollywood does to women as they age, which is just a microcosm of what happens to women generally as they age whether you want to say they become invisible or they become unattractive or undesirable or whatever it is.”

Sarandon said it’s gotten better since she began acting. “When I started, it was over by 40,” she said. “You see the line being moved a little bit further.”

However, Lange was more skeptical. “I don’t think it’s changed that much really, to tell you the truth,” she said. “It’s not necessarily a question of age or looks; I think it is who is interested in these stories. If the powers that be don’t find that there’s anything viable or interesting in a story about a woman of a certain age, those films aren’t going to be made.”

Sarandon pointed to the rise of female producers and specifically actresses developing their own material. Fittingly, Murphy told reporters after the panel that both Lange and Sarandon would remain producers on future installments of Feud even if they do not return onscreen.

When discussing potential future seasons of the drama, Murphy said they would not be set in Hollywood and would not center on women. One possibility is a story set in the 16th century, but he is also going out to friends in the industry like Mark Ruffalo about what other famous feuds might be worth bringing to the small screen.

Feud premieres Sunday, March 5 at 10 p.m. on FX.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

Flowers in the Attic | Promotional Stills and Promos

I’ve updated the photo gallery with 15 promotional stills and 2 promotional shoots from the movie Lifetime’s Flowers in the Attic. Make sure you check them out by clicking the thumbnails below. Enjoy!



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Movies > 2014 | Flowers in the Attic > Promotional Stills
Movies > 2014 | Flowers in the Attic > Promotional Shoots

Kiernan Shipka Wrote an Essay About Feminism and Fashion

And Why They’re BOTH So Necessary

The actress gets real for our September issue.

Editor’s Note: For our very special September Issue, Kiernan Shipka got to experience an anything-but-typical trip of a lifetime to explore the Chanel flower fields during the yearly, three-week May rose harvest. There, Kiernan learned exactly what goes into the iconic Chanel No. 5 fragrance (which was created by Coco Chanel herself in 1921) and the new No. 5 L’Eau, which mixes jaunty hints of citrus with the house’s signature rose de mai.

A few weeks later, it’s clear the trip left a lasting impression on the starlet, who can be seen next on the big screen in The Blackcoat’s Daughter. Our time in the fields and Coco Chanel’s sensibilities proved so inspiring to the actress that she was compelled to open up in the essay below about her current relationship with fashion, feminism, and femininity and why they can beautifully coexist.

Coco Chanel once said, “Look for the woman in the dress. If there is no woman, there is no dress.” I recently learned more about the iconic designer, who made her make rebelling against gender norms of her time, on a dream-come-true trip earlier this summer to France. I toured Coco’s apartment in Paris and also visited the rose fields of Grasse, the birthplace of Chanel No. 5. It was an expedition that changed the way I thought about the designer and her brand. I think I even changed a bit after learning so much about such a complex person and spending time in such a spectacular place.

Similar to Coco, I’ve never been someone who has thought fashion and feminism are mutually exclusive. In fact, I think they work together in a lovely, empowering way. For me, feminism is about being who you want and having the freedom of choice. As long as you have that, you should be able to dress however you like, whether it means ultrafeminine, supertomboyish, or something else entirely.

I was 6 when I started playing Sally Draper on Mad Men. I feel incredibly lucky that my first major role was someone with a lot of depth and growth, and that I was surrounded by people who treated me like a peer. For nearly eight years, I portrayed a very complicated and realized character, and there’s no question that being Sally (who is much cooler than me, by the way) has influenced my being in so many ways.

I grew up on a set surrounded by strong actresses, as fearless in real life as the roles they played, not to mention so many female writers, directors, and crew members. That was my acting school. It raised the bar for me — and influenced me. Having worked with forces of nature like Janie Bryant, Leslie Linka Glatter, and January Jones, I found my environment was so celebratory of women that it became natural for me to be myself and not live according to any standards that held me back.

I recently reached a stage in my style when I decided I was just going to really go for it. What people think no longer matters to me. I just want to enjoy myself. This mindset has made me so excited about fashion and so excited about taking risks. I’m having more fun than ever with how I dress, and I’m learning so much about my personal aesthetic along the way. I’m known for wearing a lot of feminine dresses, but lately I’ve been really into pants and how great they feel to wear (I think Coco, who made trousers more socially acceptable on women, would approve!). They’re easier to dance in, and I never know when I’m going to bust a move. Whatever the occasion, if I find a cool pair, you can count on me to be wearing them. Even if there is no dress, there can still be a woman.

Source: Teen Vogue

Shipka’s Favorite Pizza Topping Is Not What You’d Expect

Seeing as Kiernan Shipka is mature beyond her years, it shouldn’t be a huge surprise that her pizza topping of choice skews more sophisticated than pepperoni. On a recent trip to L.A., the Mad Men actress stopped by Venice Beach hotspot Gjelina and snapped a shot of a delicious-looking squash blossom pizza, captioning the pic “Pretty, pretty good.”

Pretty, pretty good.

Una foto publicada por Kiernan Shipka (@kiernanshipka) el

True to Gjelina’s vegetable-centric menu, this signature dish is topped with a medley of cherry tomatoes, burrata, Parmesan cheese, and, last but not least, squash blossoms, which, in case you’re not familiar, are edible flowers with a flavor reminiscent of squash and zucchini. We snagged the recipe for Gjelina’s legendary pizza dough, below, from the restaurant’s self-titled cookbook Gjelina ($21; amazon.com), so you can replicate the ‘gram or add your favorite toppings.

Gjelina Pizza Dough

Makes three 6 ½-oz portions

Ingredients

1 cup plus 2 tbsp warm water

1 tsp fresh yeast ($8; kingarthurflour.com)

1½ cups 00 flour ($8/2.2 lbs; amazon.com)

1½ cups bread flour, plus more for dusting ($4; amazon.com)

3 tsp fine sea salt

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing

Semolina flour for dusting ($4; jet.com)

All-purpose flour for dusting

Directions

For the dough

1. In a small bowl, combine the water and yeast, stirring until the yeast dissolves.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, combine the 00 flour and bread flour. Add the dissolved yeast to the flours and mix at medium speed just until the dough comes together, about 3 minutes. Drape a clean kitchen towel over the dough and let rest for 15 minutes. Add the salt and mix at medium-high speed for 5 to 7 minutes, until smooth and very elastic.

3. Coat a large glass or metal bowl with the olive oil. Fold the dough into thirds like a giant letter and put it in the bowl, turning it over several times to coat it with oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise at warm room temperature until it has increased its volume by 50 to 75 percent, about 3 hours. Punch the dough down, fold in thirds, and rotate it 90 degrees, then fold in thirds again. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 to 2 ½ days. If the dough grows larger than the bowl, punch it down, and return to the refrigerator.

4. Divide the dough into three 6 ½ oz pieces. Dust a little bread flour on your work surface, put the dough on the work surface, and, pressing down on it lightly with the palm of your hand, roll it in a circular motion, forming a boule (dough ball). If the dough is sliding around, there is too much flour on the work surface. Wipe some away if necessary. You need some friction between the work surface and the dough, but not so much that the dough makes a mess. Once the dough gathers into a tight ball and the outer layer of dough is pulled taut over the surface, check the bottom of the dough to see that the seam has sealed. If there is an opening on the bottom, you need to roll the dough more tightly or it will tear easily when stretched. Repeat with the remaining pieces of dough.

5 .Transfer dough balls to a baking sheet brushed with a little bit of olive oil, leaving plenty of space between the balls so they have room to rise and expand. (The boule shape encourages an even, round, and more vertical rise, as opposed to a flatter, more irregular shape.) Brush the tops with a bit of olive oil, loosely cover with plastic wrap, and let rise at room temperature until doubled in size, 1½ to 3 hours.

6. In a small bowl, combine 2 to 3 tbsp semolina flour and an equal amount of all-purpose flour, and then mound the blended flours on your work surface. Put another 2 to 3 tbsp all-purpose flour in a medium bowl. Put one of the dough balls in the bowl of all-purpose flour and turn to coat with the flour on all sides, handling the dough gently so as not to force out the air or misshape it.

7. Put the floured dough ball on top of the mount of flour on your work surface. With your fingertips, punch the air out of the dough and press your fingers into the center and extend outward to shape the mass into a small disk. Continue to press your fingers and palm down on the center but maintaining an airy rim around the perimeter. Continue stretching out the dough on the work surface with your hand by spreading your fingers as far as you can as you turn the dough.

Or, use this two-handed technique: With the palms of your hands facing down, slip your hands under the dough, lift it up, and use the backs of both hands to gently pull the dough while continuing to turn it. The dough should stretch easily, resting on the backs of your wrists and forearms, so do not pull on it too much. If it is super-elastic, then the dough probably has not proofed enough. If the dough is super-soft and tears easily, it has proofed too much. You are done stretching out the dough when it is 10 to 12-inches in diameter and thin enough so that you can read a newspaper through it. This takes a bit of practice so be patient, but under no circumstances should you resort to a rolling pin.

RELATED: How to Make a Classic Margherita Pizza at Home Using a Cult-Favorite Recipe

For the pizza

1. Place a pizza stone on the middle rack of your oven and preheat the oven to 500˚F for 1 hour.

2. Lightly dust a pizza peel or rimless baking sheet with semolina flour. Scatter toppings generously over the dough, almost covering the whole base, then slide the dough onto the pizza stone in the oven and bake, allowing it to bubble up and rise, 4 to 5 minutes. Once the rim starts to look pillowy and airy, using the pizza peel, turn the pizza 180 degrees to ensure that it browns evenly all over. It’s ready when the rim is a deep golden brown and beginning to char, and the bottom of the pizza is crisp, 6 to 8 minutes total.

3. Using the peel or a rimless baking sheet, transfer the pizza to a cutting board or a baking sheet with a rim. Slice and serve hot.

Source: InStyle

Kiernan Shipka: wide awake in dreamland

Follow the actress, spring issue cover star and Dazed 100 contender through dreamland in Ben Toms’ latest visual artistry

Growing up on screen as Mad Men’s Sally Draper, Kiernan Shipka is graduating into a deeper and darker realm of film. With a leading role as a schoolgirl possessed by the devil in upcoming horror February and her own creative ideas swirling for the year ahead, Shipka is welcoming 2016 with open arms.